Features

Mustang Tales

CARRIER OPERATIONS
A fantastic additional feature in Mustang tales is the U.S.S. Shangri-La Carrier and AI Route. An accurate depiction of the USS Shangri-La, developed by Michael Davies, is included in this product, and is depicted as it was at the time of the P-51 carrier trials. The carrier is setup with an AI route that takes the ship from the Norfolk docks up into Chesapeake Bay where the original trials actually took place. The ship's schedule even follows the times recorded from the ship's logs. 
In the fall of 1944, the U.S. Navy borrowed P-51D-5-NA 44-14017 for carrier trial examination. The aircraft, placed in the charge of test pilot Bob Elder, was fitted with tail hook and catapult gear, and was first tested on land, conducting 150 land-based arrested landings and an untold number of catapult launches and simulated carrier takeoffs. The aircraft went out to sea aboard the USS Shangri-La in November 1944, and on November
15, the aircraft performed 4 successful carrier landings and 4 successful carrier take-offs. In all, the aircraft would complete 25 landings and take-offs from the Shangri-La, including several catapult launches. Through this product you are now capable of recreating those same original carrier operations, with all of the same
details, for the first time since those trials originally took place.

The cockpit canopy is now able to be jettisoned and allows views of the detailed work we have undertaken on period radio equipment. When the ARC-3 radio set and BC-453-B receiver were installed, the SCR-522 radio set was removed, as was the APS-13 tail warning radar, BC-1206 beacon receiver, and mostly all associated panels, brackets, and controls that had been mounted along the right-wall of the cockpit. In their place, a large singular panel was installed for the ARC-3 radio, SCR-695 IFF set, and ARA-8 set controls, as well as a tuner control for the BC-453-B receiver, and a new panel that mounted the circuit breakers for all of the radios in-place of the old APS-13 panel.

Two 500 lb. Bombs & 5” HVAR Rockets
An illustration of the additional ordnance on the following aircraft
- FJ-1D Seahorse
- P-51D-25-NT 44-84489 “Royal Australian Air Force No. 77 Squadron”
- P-51D-30-NT 45-11471 “South African Air Force No. 2 Squadron.”
- F-51D-25-NT 44-84602 “Little Beast II”
- F-51D-30-NA 44-74692 “Korean Air Force – “By Faith I Fly!”

In the ‘Geraldine’ and ‘Ex-Guatemalan AF’ models, the radio controls are fully functional within the VC. These avionics include a transponder, 2 com radios, and a
navigational radio that coincides with a VOR gage which can be found on the instrument panels of those aircraft.

P-51D 'Little Friends II'

Gun Bay Detail
A fully out-fitted left gun bay is modeled on each variant, which may be opened while on the ground. The gun bay has been recreated to match all of the exact original factory specifications. Each part of the gun bay structure is properly finished in either chromate yellow or interior green paint, according to original factory photos, factory processes, and research conducted by leading Mustang restorers. Various placards and original inspection stamps can be clearly viewed and read up-close. The belts of ammunition are loaded to exactly match the proper loadingmethod, as outlined on the original ammunition-loading placard. All of the mounting brackets, ammunition feed chutes, link-ejector chutes, and shell ejector chutes for each individual 50-cal machine gun are accurately reproduced. For the rivet counters amongst us, even the number individual links in the ammunition feed chutes are correct.

N-9 Gun Sight
This reflector gun sight, the first of its type to be fully modeled for any flight simulator platform, features a fully simulated collimated reticle, that may be turned on and off, that really appears to be projected by light, just like the real thing. The N-9 reflector sight was introduced into P-51 production with the P-51D-5-NA, and would remain installed in all production P-51D’s until the introduction of the K-14 gun sight on mid-production P-51D-20-NA’s. From P-51D-5-NA to mid P-51D-15-NA production, a back-up ring and bead sight was also installed on the aircraft, incase if the N-9 sight were to fail.

To turn the N-9 gun sight on, first the aircraft’s main battery must be turned on, then the gun sight’s power turned on, using the switch on the center electrical panel, to the right of the magneto switch.

Fuel Selector Operation
The fuel selector has been pre-programmed for ease of use, rotating by use of the left and right mouse clicks, according to the proper system of usage as on the real aircraft. Starting at the default fuselage fuel tank selection, the selector may be rotated using the left mouse button, animated to transition through the fuel tank selections in proper order: CENTER, LEFT, RIGHT, LEFT DROP TANK, RIGHT DROP TANK, CENTER. At any time, the selector may be clicked on using the right mouse button, to transition backwards through this order.

Removable Exhaust Shrouds
During WWII, every P-51D rolled off the assembly line fitted with exhaust shrouds, which were in-place to just slightly improve the aerodynamics over the exhaust stacks. In service,
these shrouds were sometimes removed, often for the fact that by having them off all the time, it was one last burden that didn’t have to be dealt with during engine maintenance work. Each variant within the product has the shrouds either on or off depending on historical configuration, though in each aircraft, you can select to have them on or off, either way,
depending on your own personal choice.

Drop Tank Visibility and Release Controls
The drop tanks, though available on each model, do not show right away, even with the drop tanks filled with fuel, to support AI and FSX Recorder use. The drop tanks on the
Warbirdsim P-51D are loaded by clicking on the payload switches on the pilot’s center electrical panel, as indicated. They can be removed by either clicking on the payload switches again, or by releasing them. The drop tanks are released by first clicking on the arming switches, and then either using the manual payload-release levers, or the payload-release switch atop the control stick.

P-51D 'Little Friends'

Engine Damage (Acceleration Users Only)
The Merlin engine in the P-51 was capable of over-boosting, at up to 67-in of manifold pressure. The max design manifold pressure limitation for the Merlin engine, however, was 61-inches, as indicated by a red line on the manifold pressure gauge. If running the engine for a prolonged period of time above 61-in MP, you should expect that the engine will progressively fail. The first signs of a failing engine will be a noticeable decrease in engine noise, declining airspeed/power, and eventually even potentially a smoke trail, if the situation is not taken care of in time. If any of these signs become noticeable, it is urgent to get the aircraft on the ground quickly at the nearest airport, to prevent further damage.

Supercharger (Acceleration Users Only)
The Merlin V-1650-7 engine in the P-51D is fitted with a fully automatic, two-speed, two-stage supercharger. At between 14,500 and 19,500 feet (17,500 feet in our case), the supercharger will shift from low blower into high blower automatically. Low blower will allow the pilot to climb at 46-in MP, 2700-RPM, though continued throttle adjustments will be needed to maintain this setting as you continue to climb to higher altitudes. At 17,500 ft indicated, just about the point at which 46-in MP can no longer be maintained with the throttle full-forward, the supercharger will shift into high blower. When high blower is activated, immediate throttle input is required to reestablish a proper Manifold Pressure of 46-in, to continue the climb and prevent the engine from over-boosting for a prolonged period of time. The engine is most prone to over-boosting at low altitude, and at or just above the point at which high blower is activated. When the supercharger shifts into high blower, the supercharger indicator lamp will turn on.

Parked Configuration Effects
When the aircraft is parked on the ground, with the engine OFF, and the parking brake SET, the pilot model will disappear, and chalks will appear.

Drop Tank Visibility and Release Controls
The drop tanks, though available on each model, do not show right away, even with the drop tanks filled with fuel, to support AI and FSX Recorder use. The drop tanks on the Warbirdsim P-51D are loaded by clicking on the payload switches on the pilot’s center electrical panel, as indicated. They can be removed by either clicking on the payload switches again, or by releasing them. The drop tanks are released by first clicking on the arming switch, and then either using the manual payload-release levers, or the payload-release switch atop the control stick. Between the various models, 75-gallon metal tanks, 110-gallon metal tanks, or 108-gallon paper tanks are modeled, per the given theatre of operation, era of operation, and most common squadron use.

Fuel Selector Operation
The fuel selector has been pre-programmed for ease of use, rotating by use of the left and right mouse clicks, according to the proper system of usage as on the real aircraft. Starting at the default fuselage fuel tank selection, the selector may be rotated using the left mouse button, animated to transition through the fuel tank selections in proper order: CENTER, LEFT, RIGHT, LEFT DROP TANK, RIGHT DROP TANK, CENTER. At any time, the selector may be clicked on using the right mouse button, to transition backwards through this order.

K-14A Gun Sight
The A model of the K-14 gun sight, was the standard issue K-14 available during the later months of WWII. Modeled in exacting detail, the K-14A in Warbirdsim’s P-51D is also functional. Gun sight power is switched ON via a circuit-breaker switch on the gun sight control box as indicated. The gun sight reticle accounts for in-flight maneuvering, through realistic gyro-response control. An adjustment wheel is positioned at the side of the gun sight, in order to adjust range, which will increase or decrease the size of the reticle depending on the range selected. On the gun sight control box, you may also switch on or off the fixed crosshair, projected at the middle of the sight, which was used in combination with the moving reticle.
To bring the Mustang up for a test flight with  the gun sight removed for clearer forward vision, click on the center of the gun sight or the main gun sight bracket, to  remove.

Modern Restored P-51Ds

A new feature to the Warbirdsim P-51D is the ability to change the type of flying helmet worn. If you favour the modern HGU-55 helmet, most typically worn by pilots in their restored aircraft, then a simple click of the Detonator button, within the cockpit, will action this. Alternatively, even modern pilots prefer to wear the authentic Leather A-11 flight helmet style, to fill the period-look, so the choice is yours. Also, depending on flight conditions, you have the opportunity to raise and lower your Goggles/Visor, by clicking the number 2 Detonator button, as illustrated.

Like every other aspect of the Warbirdsim P-51D, the Virtual Cockpit is extremely detailed and accurate. The placards are individual to the type you are operating and are easily read to check you are not going to destroy your new fighter. Also in place, as per each respective variant, are the unique engraved, or stamped, data plates, on both the starboard and port sides of the cockpit. Noticeable are differing data plates, depending on location of original manufacture – ‘NT’ indicating Dallas, TX-built, and ‘NA’ indicating Inglewood, CA-built.

The K-14 can be removed or replaced by clicking on the panel just below the crash pad, or through clicking on the front of the gun sight mounting bracket.

The fuel selector has been programmed for ease of use, rotate using left and right mouse clicks according to the proper system of usage as on the real aircraft. Starting at the default fuselage fuel tank selection, the selector may be rotated using the left mouse button, animated to transition through the fuel tank selections in proper order: CENTER, LEFT, RIGHT, LEFT DROP TANK, RIGHT DROP TANK, CENTER. At any time, the selector may be clicked on using the right mouse button, to transition backwards through this order.

As in most restored Mustangs, a VOR-CDI gauge and corresponding NAV radio, is a must. Within each variant, a CDI-gauge is available, either on the instrument panel by default, or by clicking upon the factory-stock blank-gauge cover plate on the instrument panel, where-in-which the CDI will appear. This gauge is fully functional, working hand-in-hand with the NAV radio, providing the pilot VOR-navigation capability. The CDI itself has been re-finished to match the period look of the stock instruments, a practice seen in select Mustang restorations, leaving its overall impact on the period-look, minimal.

The external fuel tanks on the Warbirdsim P-51Ds, are loaded by clicking on the payload switches, mounted on the pilot’s switch panel as illustrated. They are removed by clicking the switches upward, or by releasing them, by clicking upon the arming switch, and then using either the manual payload release levers, or the switch atop the control stick. Included are the long-range, replica, ‘paper’ 108-U.S. gallon drop tanks, or the standard metal 75-U.S. gallon drop tanks (models without wing pylons do not feature selectable payload, and Ferocious Frankie is loaded with replica 500-lbs bombs, fashioned from the same examples often carried by the actual aircraft during display).

The 75-gallon metal tank, featuring accurate plumbing to this tank-type, all four fuel drain spigots, a properly-recessed fuel cap, correct mounting brackets, and correct placards & stencils.

The 108-gallon ‘paper’ tank, featuring accurate plumbing, including the ‘break-away’ glass sections, as well as accurate laminate-patterns, stencils, fuel cap, and mounting brackets.

The above illustrations demonstrate the level of attention to detail on the Warbirdsim P-51D Mustangs, with very accurately modelled drop tanks. The photograph of the restored 'Happy Jacks Go Buggy' 108 gallon replica paper tank is a good comparison.

As featured on the restored P-51D "USAF FF-704", otherwise known as N6168C, the aircraft sports the six-hardpoint zero-length rocket launcher configuration. On this variant, and only this variant, you may select to install six fully-recreated 5-in HVAR rockets, as carried on the restored aircraft for display purposes. Simply locate the rocket-controls panel at the center of the cockpit, and click on the upper-left switch, selecting RX-AUTO. This will load the rockets. To remove the rockets, click the switch again, turning the 'system' OFF. As in other variants, you may also select to have the 75-gallon drop tanks displayed, as outlined above.

HVAR rockets installed on FF-704. First introduced into the USAAF and US Navy in 1944, the 5-in "High Velocity Aircraft Rockets" were used from the very end of WWII through into the Korean War. With bomb racks removed, a late model P-51D could actually be fitted with 10 HVAR rockets in all.

A typical modern radio panel is installed in each variant, featuring a Transponder, Communications 1 Radio, Communications 2 Radio, and a Navigational Radio. Each may be tuned manually, using the corresponding knobs. These Radios may be further controlled through the use of the functional circuit breakers alongside the radio-heads. Using these circuit breakers, you may switch between Comms, or activate both Comms at once, as well as activating the audio for the NAV radio. Two green lights are provided alongside the Comms, providing easy confirmation to which are active.

The level of detail in the landing gear is illustrated here and shows that no stone has been left unturned. We have been lucky to be able to access a number of P-51D's to get down to the smallest items.

Our P-51D is the most accurate visual model that has been produced. Due to the fact we have used many original North American Aviation (NAA) drawings. Never before has the Mustang been modelled to feature modern restored examples, with accurate and faithful reproduction of the their respective cockpits and systems. The Packard Merlin powerplants are inhibited and feature a gated throttle to only allow operation at 61" MP. Additionaly we have featured an F6-D variant which has never truly been modelled for FS.

P-51B/C Mustang III

Main Features
The Warbirdsim P-51B/C Mustang is the most accurate and highly detailed P-51 visual model ever produced of this variant. Features included are:
Full animation throughout.
Five separate models.
Ten (FSX) and Eight (FS9) separate, extremely accurate and detailed colour schemes.
Highly accurate flight dynamics, approved by a P-51 Mustang owner and pilot.
Very high quality sounds recorded from inside and outside a P-51.
 

Special Detailed Features and Animations

Interior Model
Like every other aspect of the Warbirdsim Mustang model, the interior is extremely accurate and detailed throughout, for each respective P-51B/C variant.
The N3C gun sight has been modelled in fine detail, including the backup ring and bead sight.
A new Feature for the FSX models is a Functioning Gun Camera, which saves footage to your default movies folder.
For the later variants, a highly detailed Malcolm hood has been faithfully reproduced all the way down to an authentic crank, rubber weather seals, runners and main plexiglass bulge.
The virtual cockpit is very highly detailed, as you look around you may be fooled that you are there in your own aeroplane with textures and fine detail being so accurate.
The placards are easily read to check you are not overstressing or going over Vne and each aircraft has its respective factory produced engraved plate on the starbord side of the cockpit.

Animations

Every switch and lever has been accurately reproduced and animated for by-the-manual use, from startup to shutdown. The aircraft has been designed to be flown exclusively through the use of the virtual cockpit.
All control surfaces move around their actual point of contact and are not simulated with textures.
All trim tabs are adjustable using the wheels on the port side of the cockpit. You will see the effect on the flying surfaces, on the views from the virtual cockpit and from the external views.

The pilot has been thoroughly researched and is wearing the correct flying suit, helmet and goggles with all textures beautifully reproduced.
At 10,000 ft, the pilot's oxygen mask transitions into place, from its resting position alongside the pilot's helmet.


Highly detailed and accurate drop tanks and subsequent fuel lines have been modelled. These can be jettisoned through the same steps outlined in the P-51B/C manual, with working arming switches and release salvo, fully replicated.